About Tayla Foster 1 Article
Tayla Foster is a journalist from the south-west of Sydney. After completing her studies in Theatre and Journalism in 2019, she quickly began to work as both a freelance writer and a full-time editor for local newspapers and magazines. Her passion in life is to use the (literary) voice she's been blessed with to highlight the good and the bad embedded with Australia, particularly within the Australian government.

5 Comments

  1. Pell’s guilty judgement was overturned because no person should be judged and gaoled only on the evidence of his accuser, A miscarriage of justice was corrected. In the interests of truthful reporting you should be pointing this out, not smearing Pell. Think about it, because that kind of salacious rumour mongering casts doubt over the veracity and worth of all your reporting.
    Pell’s acquittal was in fact a victory for every one of us. It doesn’t reflect on Pell’s innocence or guilt, it reflects on a very important principle in justice. I’m no friend of Pell but I’m glad the High Court had the balls to ignore the rabble.

  2. Personally, I’d like you to investigate the corrupt Northern Territory labor government, currently headed by Michael Gunner regarding 1) crime in the NT , allowed to continue without recourse 2) $35 million payout to criminals, whom are STILL committing offences 3) undemocratic actions within government ‘sittings’ and the undemocratic refusal to answer ‘certain’ questions and claims 4) misuse of parliamentary privilege re shocking accusations based on misinformation and guessing 5) misuse of taxpayer funded security, airfares, family use of taxpayer $$$
    Also, check out the Victorian labor government currently headed by Daniel Andrews, his inability to govern for all constituents…
    Thankyou

  3. I’m wondering whether Porter’s legal fees were paid by the government and laundered through the ‘blind trust’. Possibly from dodgy grant money paid to mates for that purpose (with a bit on the side for the courier).

  4. Laws particularly in Australia are made ostensibly to protect the lawmakers first and the people who can afford the best lawmakers second. We only have to look at how Australian parliament currently ‘works’ to see this at its worst. In any other place in Australia, having a rape occur in your offices, destroying the evidence and then using parliamentary privilege to thwart any kind of investigation would put an entire organisation’s executive behind bars. Australia needs a new form of governance. Not under the control of criminals wearing suits and calling each other “honourable minister”. You have a guy who on the evidence available has raped a girl who has gone on to commit suicide from her trauma and the perpetrator’s position allows him to escape consequences.

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